About

About

Northern/Irish Feminist Judgments was published in February 2017. The Northern/Irish Feminist Judgments Project brings a new critical methodology to bear on Irish and Northern Irish legal studies. A…

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Judges

Judges

Judges, working solo or in pairs, will write the “missing feminist judgments” in key cases. A list of real judges from the Republic of Ireland…

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Cases

Cases

Click on a link for the full text of the judgment to be re-written, resources on the case (including images and newspaper clippings where available),…

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Events

Events

• The Foreign Subject (held at the University of Ulster, Oct 2014) • The Choosing Subject (held at Queen’s University Belfast, Dec 2014) • The Mothering Subject (held…

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Aims

Aims

Our aim is to build a judging project which resonates with work within feminist legal studies and beyond. We hope that it will be accessible…

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Resources

Resources

Bibliography Click ‘View Group’ to see the whole collection.   The picture is of Banshee, the journal of the 1970s feminist group Irish Women United.

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Feminist Judging: Northern/Irish Perspectives

Feminist Judging: Northern/Irish Perspectives

Feminist judging requires scholars to take up the judicial role to re-write important legal judgments from a feminist perspective. It demands that feminist critique and…

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Gender and the Law on the Island of Ireland: 1916-2016.

Gender and the Law on the Island of Ireland: 1916-2016.

As well as names and dates, this timeline contains photographs, video and audio clips and links which may be of interest. To navigate from one…

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Women in the Judiciary

Women in the Judiciary

The photograph is of  Miss Justice Mella Carroll,  with the then Chief Justice Tom O’Higgins. In 1980, she became the first woman to be appointed…

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Why "Northern/Irish"?

Why “Northern/Irish”?

Names are odd things. At our first workshop, Rosemary Hunter (Australian) and Clare McGlynn (Scottish) were surprised to hear us call the Feminist Judgments Project…

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